¬ tidge.com blog

¬ FedCirBlog

¬ about tidge.com

¬ patent reform

¬ archive

¬ resources/links

FEWER PATENTS

More patents invalidated in court;

Fewer patents issued by the Patent Office.

Although not necessarily the goal, any effective patent reform will necessarily have these results.


America Invents Act (AIA)

America Invents Act (AIA): A Failure by Any Measure

AIA Documentary History

Suggested Reforms (in draft)

Patent Litigation Reform

Patent Prosecution Reform

Retooling Patent Law

Talk to me: feedback@tidge.com

tidge.com's
Suggestions for
Patent Prosecution Reform

Posted: 2012-03-13 | Last revision: 2012-03-29

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Stop Forcing Engineers
to Write Essays

The format for PTO office actions is the worst possible for examiners; the fact that all of the sections of the MPEP end with exemplary sentences and paragraphs having the exact words for the examiner to use indicates just how ill-suited the format is. There should be a minimum of writing sentences and paragraphs involved (for the examiner), by doing the following:

Concentrate on Providing
a Complete and Accurate
Prosecution Record

Just as much as generating rejections/allowances and increasing throughput, the Patent Office should focus on creating the best possible public record of what invention is claimed as a result of the interaction between examiner and applicant:

Use Computer Technology to Make
More Efficient and Much Easier-to-Use
Prosecution Files

The "computer" prosecution files maintained by the PTO are still essentially paper, by which I mean scanned-in PDFs of paper documents (or created using some kind of print-to-PDF function). Maintaining a paper document paradigm within a computer framework is an extremely inefficient use of computing resources, and the PTO should use the power of computer technology to make truly computer-based prosecution records which are easier to understand, manage, and store.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

BACK TO TOP